Google wants users the most relevant results for their search. The more relevant your content is to their search, the more likely your website will be number 1 on Google. Change the titles on your least successful pages twice a year. Why? Because obviously those titles weren’t helping your least successful pages. Google wants to see a healthy link profile that signifies authority. This means quality links coming from quality content across the web with a healthy diversity. Each algorithm change brings the search engine closer to its intended purpose. It’s getting harder and harder to “game the system” with exploitive linkbuilding strategies and blackhat SEO.

Keyword research lessons to get you started

The rise of social media on the Web has created a host of new signals that search engines can consider. If a search engine makes a page request that isn’t served within the bot’s time limit (or that produces a server timeout response), your pages may not make it into the index at all, and will almost certainly rank very poorly (as no indexable text content has been found). Most SEO’s (and dare i say internet marketers) fall victim to optimizing too heavily for traffic, and not conversion. You can’t expect Google to see you as an expert on a certain topic when you have only written two sentences about it. This indicates to Google that your page probably isn’t the best result to match the search query.

Local Link Building

Go out of your way to consistently create detailed content that brings enormous value to the end user, and you'll be on your way to dominating search. We all know that getting backlinks (a.k.a. inbound links) from trusted websites is a great way to give your website’s search rankings a boost. However, there’s also a dark side to backlinks. If Google suspects that there are spammy, low-quality sites linking to your site, your rankings could suffer. This is known as “negative SEO”. (In some cases, spammers will purposely direct lots of low-quality links to your site in order to cause negative SEO.) The only way unethical SEO techniques are ever going to be eradicated is when Google themselves get clever enough to work out how to tweak their algorithm to ensure these tactics no longer work. Don’t get me wrong. Google have come a long way during the past few years in stamping out unethical SEO spam but they are far from ensuring none of it works. Google prioritizes meta information and headers first, then body copy, and finally sidebars and footers

Google can’t guarantee that your AJAX based websites or applications will be properly cached

Google has spent millions of dollars to create faster load times for search results. If they have taken load times so seriously, shouldn’t you? Before you publish, please proofread! Google doesn’t like spelling or grammar errors. Oh and don’t try to hide your keywords by, for example, placing them behind images because Google is much smarter than that. An organic search strategy that involves a dedicated consumer focused approach is highly recommended. This entails total brand presence and not just keywords, understanding customer behavior, consumption preferences, needs and conversion paths. According to Gaz Hall, a UK SEO Consultant : "If you’re goal for a guest post is to receive a backlink in return, then you would want to make sure their website has a number of good quality backlinks. The number of quality backlinks a website has will determine how powerful a link you will get."

To do SEO the right way, it takes time to test and learn all the various techniques involved in getting a website ranking.

What Google wants to see is authoritative and relatable links talking about your site. It’s important to monitor the backlinks your site is accumulating Users don’t like to wait, and we are becoming more and more accustomed to the fast load times, which means your site will be left in the dust when a user must wait. There are few things more frustrating and downright annoying than investing a large amount of money into a well-researched, written and designed piece of content — that nobody sees.